Citizens demand online interaction with government

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While most citizens still contact their central and local government bodies by phone, more than half would prefer to use web-based tools such as email, chat, or online self-service applications.

And such tools are also more cost-effective, claims Kana, which specialises in eCRM applications – while it costs up to £10 per call for an agent in a contact centre to field a customer query, emails can cost as little as £3 to respond to, it says.

According to a global survey undertaken by the company, some 53 per cent of citizens believe that the mechanisms currently available for them to interact with governmental organisations are inadequate.

About 78 per cent indicated that the telephone is still the best way to receive a timely answer to a query, but 55 per cent said they would like an online alternative.

Alf Saggese, Kana’s managing director for Europe, the Middle East and Africa, said: “This survey reveals that although constituents’ expectations for high levels of service in the public sector are in line with that of the private sector, government agencies continue to fall short in that area.”

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By admin
03rd Jul 2002 18:29

I absolutely agree with your article about citizens' demand for online interaction with government. But here in the US, accessibility is being cut off by government officials. Members of Congress now routinely only accept email from people in their districts. If your ZIP code doesn't match, the email isn't sent. Other email gets an automated response and then disappears into a dark hole. An inverse ratio between the technical ability to communicate by email and accessibility to elected officials seems to be the end result.

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avatar
By admin
03rd Jul 2002 18:29

I absolutely agree with your article about citizens' demand for online interaction with government. But here in the US, accessibility is being cut off by government officials. Members of Congress now routinely only accept email from people in their districts. If your ZIP code doesn't match, the email isn't sent. Other email gets an automated response and then disappears into a dark hole. An inverse ratio between the technical ability to communicate by email and accessibility to elected officials seems to be the end result.

Thanks (0)