Contact Management Strategy

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I'm looking to put together a contact management strategy that allows our marketing program managers who are launching outbound programs (email, phone, mail, etc.) to automatically exclude contacts/companies based on how many times they have already been communicated to in the last x days, weeks, or months.

This would allow us to put some controls on how often we are 'touching' the customer so as to 1.) Reduce our 'opt out' suppression list and 2.) To better coordinate how often we are communicating with our customers and prospects.

Does anyone have any suggestions or literature they can share on how best to approach this?

Thanks!
Jackson BlackLab

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01st Nov 2002 06:31

Reading your request makes me feel very uncomfortable.

Why? Becasue you practically admit that your marketing communications not only don`t add significant value to your customers, but also irritate enough of them that they want to opt-out of receiving more too. This is the dark-side of direct mail, where you may get enough responses to have a short-term ROI, but you irritate enough customers that they opt-out in the longer-term.

I suggest that you take a customer-guided look at the value-add of your mails before you just try to manage down the number of opt-out rejections.

As far as the customer contact strategy goes, the best approach is to analyse mail contacts by customer cohorts over time to see in what circumstances the opt-out rate becomes too high. If you are lucky and have data that allows you to statistically analyse previous campaigns as factorial experiments, then that will help you.

Otherwise you might be best placed to design a few mail experiments to test your assumptions about what works and what doesn`t. Talking to customers is a great way to develop your assumptions. And I mean just that, talking to them, not third-party market research.

Best regards from Köln, Graham Hill

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avatar
01st Nov 2002 06:31

Reading your request makes me feel very uncomfortable.

Why? Becasue you practically admit that your marketing communications not only don`t add significant value to your customers, but also irritate enough of them that they want to opt-out of receiving more too. This is the dark-side of direct mail, where you may get enough responses to have a short-term ROI, but you irritate enough customers that they opt-out in the longer-term.

I suggest that you take a customer-guided look at the value-add of your mails before you just try to manage down the number of opt-out rejections.

As far as the customer contact strategy goes, the best approach is to analyse mail contacts by customer cohorts over time to see in what circumstances the opt-out rate becomes too high. If you are lucky and have data that allows you to statistically analyse previous campaigns as factorial experiments, then that will help you.

Otherwise you might be best placed to design a few mail experiments to test your assumptions about what works and what doesn`t. Talking to customers is a great way to develop your assumptions. And I mean just that, talking to them, not third-party market research.

Best regards from Köln, Graham Hill

Thanks (0)