Email Campaign management and SMS

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We are looking into purchasing an email campaign management package that provides or plans to provide integration with mobile SMS messaging.

Currently, we have found that Chordiant provides an add-in module for SMS messaging. It seems that they have a great product, however, we are a bit worried about Chordiant's financial status and understand that they lost over $8 million in revenues in 3rd quarter last year. Just a bit worried about purchasing a package from a company that may go out of business.

Does anybody have any thoughts about Chordiant? Also, is anybody aware of other packages that either do provide SMS messaging, plan to provide it in the future, or partner with a company that does provide it?

Please advise, will appreciate...

Thanks,
Phil
Phil Mak

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By admin
08th Jan 2002 23:48

Although recent survey figures show that the youth market like the concept of MMS (Multimedia Messaging Services) we need to consider them in context. Although this demographic like the idea of multimedia messaging in principal, the reality is that day-to-day use will be provided for by SMS(or EMS as it will become).

The youth market will use MMS for event-driven communication (ie birthdays, congratulations) and marketing companies will be able to use this media to create visually appealing advertising etc *but* we need to consider many of the reasons why MMS *wont* be successful on a day-to-day basis :-

* Pricing. As MMS is transmitted through the traffic rather than radio channels of cell broadcast it will most probably be priced per byte on a gprs+ network. So, a video enabled MMS transmission will be costly for both the sender *and* the recipient. The youth Market is very price sensitive. Remember, one of the key drivers for SMS was cost-effectiveness over making a voice call on a prepay tariff (which could typically cost 50p/minute).

* Secondly, compatibility. MMS is available on new handsets such as the Ericsson t68. However, it requires the full implementation of WAP2.0 gateways as well as MMSCs (Service centres) on the networks. Furthermore it requires an overwhelming adoption in the youth market of MMS-enabled handsets. SMS only took off when it became fully-interoperable on all networks *and* most people had the ability to use it.

* Most importantly, we need to consider need. To say "C U L8er" in txt speak can be done very easily on an SMS/EMS transmission. Does a kid need an animated message or pictures to accompany this to convey the message? Consider the internet. With the existence of multimedia email in HTML format with the ability to use formatted text, graphics, audio and video as includes we still persist in using plain text email to get our messages across. Why ? Because that's all we need in most cases. Of course, animated postcards and the like are popular but they will account for less than 5% of the real traffic.

In Summary, MMS will be successful in event driven circumstances. It will also be popular for areas such as ringtones, logos and brand marketing. We need caution in examining its application however. It will not replace SMS/EMS as a basic form of communication and we need to bear this in mind when examining the potential of MMS.

Further research on this subject is available at http://www.mobileyouth.org

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
05th Dec 2001 10:46

Thanks for the clarification Kevin.

We're currently very interested in Chordiant as a solution, due mainly to its extremely open and flexible architecture.

However, our company is based in Beijing, China. We would be very interested if you could direct us to any of your partners or re-sellers in the Asia Pacific region that could help answer our questions.

Thanks,
Phil

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
27th Dec 2001 14:17

Phil
There are some companies that do offer Email and SMS campaign management - the company that I work for, Swetenhams (see our storefront in the Yellow Pages) have a combined product - however, as we are still young we only operate in the UK at present.
However....there are several companies out there that can take a Text email, convert it to SMS and then send it. One that I know of can even handle replies, returning them (either via email or XML) to your campaign management tool for action, as well as sending a "thanks for responding" type message. This would mean that you would only be looking for campaign management with email automation - and there are lots of such packages out there (although you might want to consider importing response data into your campaign management tool for supressions or communications history, for example).

This has several advntages;
1 - your are distanced from the SMS technology side of the equation, which can be a problem particularly with message formats and standards between service providers.
2 - As and when 3G or whatever eventually takes off, assuming that your supplier's supports it, you can change to the new technolgy reasonably painlessly
3 - Try before you buy. Most of the suppliers that I know will allow you to set up some sort of trail. Although the cost per message will be higher than when you roll out (due to volume discounts etc), this will allow you, as per the other posts, to see if SMS works in you marketing mix.
4. Cost. No software module to buy and implement.....

Hope this helps

David Barragry

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
11th Dec 2001 16:37

Phil,
I attach the contact details for our Australian offices.....

Melbourne Office:
Level 8, 440 Collins Street
Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
Tel: +61 3 9607-1308

Sydney Office:
Level 39, 2 Park Street
Sydney NSW 2000, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9004 7111

I hope they can help you....Kind regards, Kevin.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
03rd Dec 2001 14:23

Phil,
I believe you are confusing Cordiant Communications Group http://www.ccgww.com/with Chordiant Software http://chordiant.com. I agree with you that the Chordiant solution is a great product.....CCGW have announced losses and are restructuring but Chordiant Software goes from strength to strength. 151% growth year over year, more than 150% revenue growth over last 2 quarters, Seven consecutive quarters of revenue growth since IPO, conservative revenue recognition policy and high visibility, strong balance sheet – total assets of $136.9m, $62.5 million cash balance, no long term debt, deferred revenue of $30m. Customer engagements at BSkyB, H3G, Direct Line and Royal Bank of Scotland. I would be happy to discuss with you the Marketing Director product and the on-line channel capabilities....

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
03rd Dec 2001 15:47

Phil, Don't get hooked into vendor stories on SMS - I would really recommend that you pilot the technology first. Don't leap in and buy something, thinking that it's going to solve all your problems - it may not. Things you should consider with SMS:
1. Will your user base accept SMS as an acceptable contact medium?
2. Have you even got your customers' mobile numbers? If you haven't, how long will it take to get them? And what will it cost you?
3. Will vendor's products "map" with the technology? E.g. EMS is on the way - will they support this when your customers want to contact you using it?
My advice would be to pilot it first and if the return is good enough then by all means buy a specific product. I have a little experience in the SMS area so feel free to mail me at [email protected]. Hope it helps.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
08th Jan 2002 23:48

Although recent survey figures show that the youth market like the concept of MMS (Multimedia Messaging Services) we need to consider them in context. Although this demographic like the idea of multimedia messaging in principal, the reality is that day-to-day use will be provided for by SMS(or EMS as it will become).

The youth market will use MMS for event-driven communication (ie birthdays, congratulations) and marketing companies will be able to use this media to create visually appealing advertising etc *but* we need to consider many of the reasons why MMS *wont* be successful on a day-to-day basis :-

* Pricing. As MMS is transmitted through the traffic rather than radio channels of cell broadcast it will most probably be priced per byte on a gprs+ network. So, a video enabled MMS transmission will be costly for both the sender *and* the recipient. The youth Market is very price sensitive. Remember, one of the key drivers for SMS was cost-effectiveness over making a voice call on a prepay tariff (which could typically cost 50p/minute).

* Secondly, compatibility. MMS is available on new handsets such as the Ericsson t68. However, it requires the full implementation of WAP2.0 gateways as well as MMSCs (Service centres) on the networks. Furthermore it requires an overwhelming adoption in the youth market of MMS-enabled handsets. SMS only took off when it became fully-interoperable on all networks *and* most people had the ability to use it.

* Most importantly, we need to consider need. To say "C U L8er" in txt speak can be done very easily on an SMS/EMS transmission. Does a kid need an animated message or pictures to accompany this to convey the message? Consider the internet. With the existence of multimedia email in HTML format with the ability to use formatted text, graphics, audio and video as includes we still persist in using plain text email to get our messages across. Why ? Because that's all we need in most cases. Of course, animated postcards and the like are popular but they will account for less than 5% of the real traffic.

In Summary, MMS will be successful in event driven circumstances. It will also be popular for areas such as ringtones, logos and brand marketing. We need caution in examining its application however. It will not replace SMS/EMS as a basic form of communication and we need to bear this in mind when examining the potential of MMS.

Further research on this subject is available at http://www.mobileyouth.org

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
02nd Jan 2002 19:47

Hi Phil

We have a 100% web based solution that includes SMS delivery for Campaign Management as well as Sales Force Automation and Customer Care.

Please follow this link for more information http://www.accpac.com/products/eCRM/tours/default.asp or give me a call to discuss on 44 1753 241057.

Thanks

Keith Fenner
Assistant Vice President, Internet Business
ACCPAC International

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
27th Dec 2001 14:17

Phil
There are some companies that do offer Email and SMS campaign management - the company that I work for, Swetenhams (see our storefront in the Yellow Pages) have a combined product - however, as we are still young we only operate in the UK at present.
However....there are several companies out there that can take a Text email, convert it to SMS and then send it. One that I know of can even handle replies, returning them (either via email or XML) to your campaign management tool for action, as well as sending a "thanks for responding" type message. This would mean that you would only be looking for campaign management with email automation - and there are lots of such packages out there (although you might want to consider importing response data into your campaign management tool for supressions or communications history, for example).

This has several advntages;
1 - your are distanced from the SMS technology side of the equation, which can be a problem particularly with message formats and standards between service providers.
2 - As and when 3G or whatever eventually takes off, assuming that your supplier's supports it, you can change to the new technolgy reasonably painlessly
3 - Try before you buy. Most of the suppliers that I know will allow you to set up some sort of trail. Although the cost per message will be higher than when you roll out (due to volume discounts etc), this will allow you, as per the other posts, to see if SMS works in you marketing mix.
4. Cost. No software module to buy and implement.....

Hope this helps

David Barragry

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
02nd Jan 2002 19:47

Hi Phil

We have a 100% web based solution that includes SMS delivery for Campaign Management as well as Sales Force Automation and Customer Care.

Please follow this link for more information http://www.accpac.com/products/eCRM/tours/default.asp or give me a call to discuss on 44 1753 241057.

Thanks

Keith Fenner
Assistant Vice President, Internet Business
ACCPAC International

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
11th Dec 2001 16:37

Phil,
I attach the contact details for our Australian offices.....

Melbourne Office:
Level 8, 440 Collins Street
Melbourne VIC 3000, Australia
Tel: +61 3 9607-1308

Sydney Office:
Level 39, 2 Park Street
Sydney NSW 2000, Australia
Tel: +61 2 9004 7111

I hope they can help you....Kind regards, Kevin.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
03rd Dec 2001 14:23

Phil,
I believe you are confusing Cordiant Communications Group http://www.ccgww.com/with Chordiant Software http://chordiant.com. I agree with you that the Chordiant solution is a great product.....CCGW have announced losses and are restructuring but Chordiant Software goes from strength to strength. 151% growth year over year, more than 150% revenue growth over last 2 quarters, Seven consecutive quarters of revenue growth since IPO, conservative revenue recognition policy and high visibility, strong balance sheet – total assets of $136.9m, $62.5 million cash balance, no long term debt, deferred revenue of $30m. Customer engagements at BSkyB, H3G, Direct Line and Royal Bank of Scotland. I would be happy to discuss with you the Marketing Director product and the on-line channel capabilities....

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
03rd Dec 2001 15:47

Phil, Don't get hooked into vendor stories on SMS - I would really recommend that you pilot the technology first. Don't leap in and buy something, thinking that it's going to solve all your problems - it may not. Things you should consider with SMS:
1. Will your user base accept SMS as an acceptable contact medium?
2. Have you even got your customers' mobile numbers? If you haven't, how long will it take to get them? And what will it cost you?
3. Will vendor's products "map" with the technology? E.g. EMS is on the way - will they support this when your customers want to contact you using it?
My advice would be to pilot it first and if the return is good enough then by all means buy a specific product. I have a little experience in the SMS area so feel free to mail me at [email protected]. Hope it helps.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
05th Dec 2001 10:46

Thanks for the clarification Kevin.

We're currently very interested in Chordiant as a solution, due mainly to its extremely open and flexible architecture.

However, our company is based in Beijing, China. We would be very interested if you could direct us to any of your partners or re-sellers in the Asia Pacific region that could help answer our questions.

Thanks,
Phil

Thanks (0)