Privacy guru joins IBM

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IBM has named Harriet P. Pearson as the company’s first chief privacy officer. She will lead initiatives to strengthen privacy for consumers, and will report to L.R. Ricciardi, senior vice president and general counsel.

Before joining the company in 1993, Pearson practiced law in Washington, DC, and worked as an engineer with Shell Offshore in Louisiana and Texas.

She brings 10 years of public policy, legal and technology experience to the position. In addition to having directed IBM’s involvement in several areas of public policy - including privacy, health care and consumer protection - she chairs the privacy committee of the Information Technology Industry Council and serves on the board of the Internet Education Foundation and on the BBBOnline privacy seal program steering committee. She also is on the executive committee of the CEO-level Privacy Leadership Initiative.

“We know that one of the great conundrums of e-business is that it gives enterprises a powerful new capability to capture and analyze massive amounts of customer information so they can serve individuals more effectively,” said chairman Louis Gerstner, Jr.

“Yet this very capability troubles some people, who see it as a means to disclose or exploit their personal information. These are legitimate concerns, and they must be addressed if the world of e-business is to reach its full potential.”

Continuing, Gerstner said, “At its core, privacy is not a technology issue. It is a policy issue. And the policy framework that’s needed here must involve the information technology industry, the private sector in general and public officials. As our chief privacy officer, Harriet Pearson will represent IBM with all of these important communities and drive our own cross-company initiatives.”

Pearson will unify the many privacy projects and programs under way across IBM - including research and development, marketing, sales, web strategy and technology and policy efforts.

“Harriet has the unique mix of skills and experience a company like IBM must have to balance its corporate needs with those of its consumers,” said Professor Alan Westin, a privacy expert.

Born and reared in New York City, Pearson, 37, holds a law degree from the University of California, Los Angeles, and an engineering degree from Princeton University. She lives in Virginia with her husband and two children.

IBM

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By admin
04th Dec 2000 15:31

1) Right to establish relationships. (The right to assemble, form & join cyber communities of like minded individuals)

2) Right to keep & bear "arms". (The right to defend my privacy & identity through anonymity & encryption)

3) Right to e-ID exclusive ownership & use unless expressly granted to another. (Morally & ethically only I can own & use my own identity, both real & electronic. Only I can assign that right)

4) Right to freedom from illegal search or seizure of my e-ID. (There is NO such thing as a public e-ID & the fact that companies or governments have "collected & mined" my information does NOT make it theirs)

5) Right to determine when, how & with whom my e-ID is used. ("Express permission only" use is the rule, not the exception. And that permission is on a case by case basis for a designated time & purpose)

6) Right to a speedy & public trial for criminal misuse of my e-ID. (Real courts deliver speedy justice for violation of individual rights, there should be NO difference with e-ID rights)

7) Right to trial by jury for accusations of criminal use of my e-ID. (I receive presumed innocence in the real world, so should I in the electronic world)

8) Right to free & unrestricted e-ID use not constrained by taxes, fines, fees, regulations or unusual bureaucratic encumbrances. (Freedom of movement exists in the real world, it should in the cyber world also)

9) Rights not enumerated for my e-ID are retained by me. (Rights are inherent, not granted. And always changing with the changing nature of the threat. Our founders could not have imagined the nature of threats we face against our personal liberty today. But they well understood the nature of abuse of power by the many against the individual)

10) Rights not expressly given to Federal or State government are retained by me. (Our government exists for & by the people. Not in spite of or in contravention to the people)

Copyright ©2000
Don M. Darragh

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
04th Dec 2000 15:31

1) Right to establish relationships. (The right to assemble, form & join cyber communities of like minded individuals)

2) Right to keep & bear "arms". (The right to defend my privacy & identity through anonymity & encryption)

3) Right to e-ID exclusive ownership & use unless expressly granted to another. (Morally & ethically only I can own & use my own identity, both real & electronic. Only I can assign that right)

4) Right to freedom from illegal search or seizure of my e-ID. (There is NO such thing as a public e-ID & the fact that companies or governments have "collected & mined" my information does NOT make it theirs)

5) Right to determine when, how & with whom my e-ID is used. ("Express permission only" use is the rule, not the exception. And that permission is on a case by case basis for a designated time & purpose)

6) Right to a speedy & public trial for criminal misuse of my e-ID. (Real courts deliver speedy justice for violation of individual rights, there should be NO difference with e-ID rights)

7) Right to trial by jury for accusations of criminal use of my e-ID. (I receive presumed innocence in the real world, so should I in the electronic world)

8) Right to free & unrestricted e-ID use not constrained by taxes, fines, fees, regulations or unusual bureaucratic encumbrances. (Freedom of movement exists in the real world, it should in the cyber world also)

9) Rights not enumerated for my e-ID are retained by me. (Rights are inherent, not granted. And always changing with the changing nature of the threat. Our founders could not have imagined the nature of threats we face against our personal liberty today. But they well understood the nature of abuse of power by the many against the individual)

10) Rights not expressly given to Federal or State government are retained by me. (Our government exists for & by the people. Not in spite of or in contravention to the people)

Copyright ©2000
Don M. Darragh

Thanks (0)