The Sales Forecast

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How can a CRM system or CRM process function effectively without tight definitions of all the related process/system components?

For example the definitions associated with the Sales Forecast i.e. Opportunity, Pipeline, Forecast, Upside, Downside and Probability to close.

Stephen Pye

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06th Mar 2003 17:30

Stephen

You are describing the world of 'big-iron' CRM. Monolithic software 'solutions' based around standardised processes that big vendors have fixed in place for your advantage! Of course you can customise these applications, but that isn't always as easy as it sounds. Or as quick.

Or then you could look to a business model based upon adaptable processes, coded into a business-rules driven system architecture as an alternative. This would allow you to specify appropriate processes, scripts and their associated business rules dynamically. As your business changes, so does the application and business logic that sits underneath it.

Chris Date, the founding father of RDBMS recently wrote a book on it, and there are a number of new vendors out there who work in this space.

In today's business environment, unless you are lucky enough to work in a practically non-competitive industry, then being 100% right wit the unchanging core but 80% right with the value-added periphery and experimenting with what works, is a better strategy than waiting till everything is perfect. At least for CRM anyway.

All you have to lose are your big vendor chains. Break out the hammer and chisel.

Best regards from Koeln, Graham Hill
Independent CRM Consultant

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avatar
06th Mar 2003 17:30

Stephen

You are describing the world of 'big-iron' CRM. Monolithic software 'solutions' based around standardised processes that big vendors have fixed in place for your advantage! Of course you can customise these applications, but that isn't always as easy as it sounds. Or as quick.

Or then you could look to a business model based upon adaptable processes, coded into a business-rules driven system architecture as an alternative. This would allow you to specify appropriate processes, scripts and their associated business rules dynamically. As your business changes, so does the application and business logic that sits underneath it.

Chris Date, the founding father of RDBMS recently wrote a book on it, and there are a number of new vendors out there who work in this space.

In today's business environment, unless you are lucky enough to work in a practically non-competitive industry, then being 100% right wit the unchanging core but 80% right with the value-added periphery and experimenting with what works, is a better strategy than waiting till everything is perfect. At least for CRM anyway.

All you have to lose are your big vendor chains. Break out the hammer and chisel.

Best regards from Koeln, Graham Hill
Independent CRM Consultant

Thanks (0)