Zach Nelson, NetSuite: “Every company is a Cloud company today”

Zach Nelson, NetSuite: “Every company is a Cloud company today”

“Big Data, social and mobile – these are the trends that are driving the rearchitecture of corporate systems.”

Speaking at the Business Cloud Summit in London, the NetSuite CEO spoke of the company’s centralised data model, citing Big Data as a natural progression from the growth of Cloud Computing.

“Social and mobile were also artefacts of what Cloud Computing enabled,” he said.

But rather than rank them in order, C-level executives must look at the three technologies holistically. “Every company is a Cloud company today, and companies are beginning to consider themselves as this and are now figuring out how to expose their data to customers.”

Businesses must meet customer requirements as to how they want to interact with your business, he said.

Turning to ecommerce as a service, of which NetSuite launched its own service earlier this year, Nelson said: “Most companies build an ecommerce system on the side to deal with web transactions but instead of making that app look like a business app, we could make it look customer facing. Commerce operations are the future for all businesses.

For example, Apple treats you the same from whichever touchpoint you’re on; and most amazingly, there’s no human in that process. It’s the machine delivering the custoemr experience.” A company can only do that when they aggregate their data, he says, which shows the operational impact of Big Data.

As in previous years at the Business Cloud Summit, the CEO divulged his mystic predictions for the future. “We will beign to offer a multichanel commerce solution, online and in-store to deliver an Apple-like experience. In terms of competitors, look at the move to the Cloud – as companies begin making that shift we’ll begin to see companies like Sage do the same, although for them revenues will shrink to begin with.

“Microsoft managed to hang on but Windows 8 will be the last Windows release that they do. Services companies will start to look more like software companies, using apps similar to Salesforce.com to resell knowledge over and over again.”

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