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Customers at the heart of change

21st Apr 2020
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Disruption, home working and isolation. Except perhaps for the initial heady days of start-up, businesses have rarely had to cope with so much change in such a short time period. That process which previously needed signing off by a chain of people, that go-to  individual who always seemed to know the answer to obscure procedures, that face to face Monday meeting which cleared the way for a good week’s work; all these and more swept away in the face of COVID-19.

And businesses have coped. More than coped in fact as working from home and virtual conferences have become the new normal. If you want to pick someone’s brain just pick up the phone or click on a link. If you need to fast forward a project or sign off a process then sharing documents or flattening the chain of command could be the solution. And did you really need so many people to give their input into any change in the first place?

When this is over we may all have learnt something important about the way in which our business have been run; in particular about how easy it has been to cast off the shackles of legacy process in a bid to move things forward. We’ve found workarounds and new ways of doing things which we may never have thought about, let alone tried, until this crisis came along.

Consider the impact on customers

However, and this is a big however, we also have to ask whether the changes we have made have been solely for the benefit of the business and its people. Just how much did we consider the impact on customers when instituting change?  After all it is one thing to change warehouse processes in order to meet social distancing requirements, quite another to manage customer’s expectations of the effect this will have on order and delivery times.

When we are fire fighting it is all too easy to let something slip through the net. But how hard is it to add a little more information to the web site, or to send out a SMS text message or e-mail to customers. And when we are considering new processes would it really delay things if we took a few minutes to consider the potential impact on customers. Of course, the alternative might be no service at all but that’s where a marketing campaign comes in, telling people what you are doing and why.

It’s all very well saying that our customers will understand; that they will make allowances in the current climate. But will they? The danger is that they may move their allegiance to others who have put customers first when implementing change. Customers at the heart of change? Now that is one lesson that we can certainly take forward into the future.

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By DeweyBeck
14th May 2020 09:37

After all it is one thing to change warehouse processes in order to meet social distancing requirements, quite another to manage customer’s expectations of the effect this will have on order and delivery times. https://www.mcdvoice.reviews/

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