Do you need a customer interaction catalogue?

21st Jul 2021
Associate Director Optima Partners
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Do You Need an Interaction Catalogue
Dr. Graham Hill

This is part of a series on 'Rethinking the Service Experience'.

Companies need to capture interactions with customers in a catalogue. This provides the foundation for journey analytics (and customer journey mapping).

For many designers the process of designing services and their associated experiences is more of a qualitative process employing designerly abduction. If you have spend years working on the front-line, you could probably design pretty good service experiences this way. But how many designers have spend any time working on the front-line? Not all that many.

For those designers that have had little contact with customers, qualitative approaches will only take you so far. As I described in an earlier post, the sweet spot is in combining quantitative journey analytics to tell you what customers really do, with qualitative journey research to tell you why they did it.

If you are going to use journey analytics you will need to capture details of thousands, probably millions of interactions customers have with you. And across the different channels available, some of them potentially operated by partners. As most companies don't capture interaction data in a consistent way, this may involve significant tagging of interactions in channels, collecting new interaction data, transforming it against a common taxonomy and collating it in an interaction catalogue.

It is the interaction catalogue that provides the foundation for service experience design. It provides a single place where detailed interaction data, in a common format, is available for all to use. You can use it to analyse real customer journeys and create network and Sankey diagrams to show how customers 'flow' through their journeys. You can use it to identify problem interactions where customers spend too much time, that create expensive next interactions, or worse, where the journey is abruptly abandoned. And of course, you can use it to create customer journey maps illustrating idealised journeys to show to senior management.

Without an interaction catalogue and the means to analyse it, service experience design has to rely on qualitative design. Why limit yourself in that way when an interaction catalogue opens up so many quantitative, analytical possibilities?

TAKEAWAYS:

1. Identify what interaction data is available to you, what data you need and create an interaction taxonomy specifying what data you should collect about each interaction.

2. Setup appropriate tags across different channels and data collection APIs, collect the interaction data and store it in an interaction catalogue.
Note: You may be able to employ event mining technology to do some of this.

3. Use the interaction catalogue as a foundation for journey analytics, interaction problem solving and if required, customer journey mapping.

What do you think? Do you need a customer interaction catalogue?

#ServiceDesign #CX #InteractionCatalogue #InteractionTaxonomy

Original LinkedIn post: https://www.linkedin.com/posts/grahamhill_servicedesign-cx-interactionca...

Replies (2)

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Dr. Graham Hill
By Dr. Graham Hill
21st Jul 2021 08:40

Further Reading:
As I described in an earlier post, the sweet spot is in combining quantitative journey analytics to tell you what customers really do, with qualitative journey research to tell you why they did it...
THE SWEET SPOT: JOURNEY ANALYTICS PLUS JOURNEY RESEARCH
https://www.linkedin.com/posts/grahamhill_servicedesign-cx-journeyanalyt...

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Dr. Graham Hill
By Dr. Graham Hill
21st Jul 2021 09:01

More Further Reading:
Pegasystems, one of the leading RTIM solutions, provides an detailed description of what data it collects in its Interaction History table...
Interaction History data model in Pega 7.3.1
https://community.pega.com/knowledgebase/articles/decision-management-ov...
It provides a good starting point when thinking about how to create your own Interaction Catalogue and the Taxonomy around which it should be structured

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