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Beyond NPS validity - a culture of change

17th Feb 2017
CEO Hello Customer Hello Customer
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There is a lot of debate out there about the value and validity of NPS. It's said to be an unproven method, without actual correlations between a great score and growth / increased revenues. If you focus on the score part, the debate may go on forever.

But that's the thing, you shouldn't be focusing on the score itself. That's just the means to an end. You shouldn't even think of NPS as a metric. Measuring NPS in itself will not increase your customer experience and will never drive revenue. The true value of NPS is in the collateral. It's Net Promoter Strategy.

Having an intensive NPS programme creates change. It closes the gap between yourself and your customers.

First and foremost, NPS is a great driver of honest and open customer feedback, specifically after or in an interaction. It's the feedback itself that holds the value. It's about what customers tell you, how they perceive you and how you interact with them afterwards. It's the truest power of NPS, because it:

  • makes you truly understand your customers
  • motivates your staff and makes them enthusiastic
  • motivates your customers to continue to give you constructive feedback
  • enhances a real emotional connection

If you allow feedback to flow freely in your organisation, from the board to the point of sales, you allow for awareness to build. Awareness that customers are people, just like you. It makes employees change their behaviour, even subconsciously.

NPS is also a real-time pulse, enabling you to intervene instantly when a customer was treated badly or when something went wrong. This means that contrary to being blind to what happens on the floor, you create constant opportunities to win back lost customers.

What we often see in organisations that start up an NPS programme, is that after a few months they start investing in people. People with the sole focus of making customers happy. We see full time positions created in customer care, customer assistance and experience. We see companies waking up and seeing their customers as if for the first time. We see them enthusiastic about service and cater to the needs of their customers.

So, then. Does NPS work, you think?

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