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What can we learn from Vine's porn #fail?

29th Jan 2013
Contributor MyCustomer.com
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It’s hardly rocket science to think that creating a six second video platform that integrates into an all-accessible social network is likely to result in a porn problem. And as the creators of that platform you’d be carefully monitoring for porn/spam abuse, right? Well, apparently not.

In a moment of twisted fate, Twitter has become its own case study of social media crisis after accidentally publishing a six second porn video through its Vine app and showcasing it to the platform’s users in nothing less significant than the Editor’s picks feature. Oops.

Of course, true to best practice in such situations, Twitter immediately deleted the post upon realising its mistake and released a statement that read: “A human error resulted in a video with adult content becoming one of the videos in Editor's Picks, and upon realising this mistake we removed the video immediately.

"We apologise to our users for the error."

Cue the predicted member outrage and disbanded accounts, and the news that Twitter has now begun censoring search results on Vine for terms such as ‘sex’ and ‘porn’.

So, as we like to examine these crises of social media #fail on MyCustomer.com, what can we learn from Twitter's personal mistake? The key words here are ‘human error’. From KitchenAid’s post about the death of Obama’s grandmother to views on Detroit’s poor drivers posted from the Chrysler account, we’ve seen countless moments of brands strung up for ‘human error’ (and probably the career death of the executive or intern in charge).

Ok, some may find the Vine porn moment offensive but behind every brand social account is a human, and humans make mistakes. Whilst offensive to some, it’s these moments that show the human behind the account – which we all know to be important in revealing the brand's true authenticity and voice. 

Vine’s co-founder signs off the platform’s first blog post with the strapline ‘Make a scene.’  Well, it’s certainly done that.

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