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Internal CRM

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17th Jul 2002
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Many of us having been emphasising the "people and process" aspects to implementing CRM strategies for the organisation's customers.

Personnel issues, such as motivation, compensation, management and training are often raised.

I'm looking for some direction on the topic of internal CRM - white papers, case studies, thoughts...
Jo Gore

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By michaelmeltzer
22nd Jul 2002 23:38

Many organisations equate the term customer relationship management (CRM) directly with technologies such as call/contact centres and sales force automation systems or as some means of improving their level of service. It is bad enough when this view applies to the external face the organisation shows the world but is worse when you try to get it to focus internally and treat each other as valued customers. Focus on internal customer relationships seems to be something that just does not happen. Yet in many ways each team member in an organisation tends to be the customer of another department, division or the individual down the next corridor.

Althoughth above is one of my familiar refrains I am still amazed that the 'experts' out there equate anything that has relationship in to mean that you really mean some form of technology support almost immediately. Few recognise the need for customer relationships to begin inside an organisation. If you get the people and processes right inside you are more than likely to be able to offer the right kinds of services and products your customers demand.

Customers exist inside an organisation as well as out and one of the newer ways of making things really start happening inside an organisation is refocusing on users and clients as if they are are really customers!("THEY ARE") And in reality thay are as they pay for services and products they get from different parts of the company.

If the other part cannot deliver to the specified quality, price or speed they might get outsourced. Services today that are outsourced range from manufacturing, marketing, book-keeping, HR, payroll and even the IT department. So if you cannoyt build relationships with your internal customers you may get.......

Success in building relationships internally often relates to trust, understanding and leadership through knowledge. I could go on but it's getting late and I think this could be a future article so watch this space or I might tackle part of it in my newsletter - the customer knowledge infrastructure on this site!

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By klynn
23rd Jul 2002 12:09

The company I work for is currently going through a "CRM realisation", my past is well grounded on ebuisness , so I can best understand where the pitfalls are for technology and the bottom line is peoples resistance to change.

If you can make "Change" manageable by first carrying out a needs analysis with your internal customers and act as a bridge across all depts you can quickly spot the quick wins and deliver.

This might not involve technology at all but just facilitating like minded people to meet and thrash out common objectives

I havent spent any money on technology or external consultants, because the company holds most of its answers in its employees heads

Seek to get the training dept on board, they can help you formualte and effective communcation strategy that will help bridge the "Strategic-Implementation" gap.

Sow the seeds, stand back and watch them grow!

Klynn Alibocus

CRM manager

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avatar
By admin
20th Jul 2002 04:27

We have recently implemented http://www.e11online.com as internal CRM for one of the departments of Govt. of USA. The result is very good. You can see the white paper of the same on our website.
Regards

Thanks (0)
avatar
By AnonymousUser
19th Jul 2002 19:33

I have come to prefer Customers' Success Management (CSM) to CRM, because CRM is severely handicapped -- first by its obsession with technology as the solution to customer relationships, and second by its being not customer-centric, but self-centric, i.e. focusing only on how much lifetime value the firm can get out of a relationship with customers, rather than how much lifetime value customers can get out of a relationship with the firm.

When examined in the context of internal relationships management, i.e. with employees, using ESM makes even more sense than ERM, since it is the extent to which employees believe they are gaining what they define as success through working for the firm that drives their retention intentions, as much as how much joy they get out of the work experience. And in another context, what would be one of the definitions of "internal marketing" = treating other units and departments you serve or affect as if they are your internal customers, and trying to get the units and departments that serve and affect you as if you are their customer -- also makes more sense to be conducted as CSM, where both parties are trying to promote the other's success in addition to their own.

I have an article on Employee Success Management coming out in the August issue of Health Care Strategic Management, addressing one aspect of CSM as applied to employee recruitment and retention in an industry where shortages of key staff are severe and growing.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By michaelmeltzer
22nd Jul 2002 23:38

Many organisations equate the term customer relationship management (CRM) directly with technologies such as call/contact centres and sales force automation systems or as some means of improving their level of service. It is bad enough when this view applies to the external face the organisation shows the world but is worse when you try to get it to focus internally and treat each other as valued customers. Focus on internal customer relationships seems to be something that just does not happen. Yet in many ways each team member in an organisation tends to be the customer of another department, division or the individual down the next corridor.

Althoughth above is one of my familiar refrains I am still amazed that the 'experts' out there equate anything that has relationship in to mean that you really mean some form of technology support almost immediately. Few recognise the need for customer relationships to begin inside an organisation. If you get the people and processes right inside you are more than likely to be able to offer the right kinds of services and products your customers demand.

Customers exist inside an organisation as well as out and one of the newer ways of making things really start happening inside an organisation is refocusing on users and clients as if they are are really customers!("THEY ARE") And in reality thay are as they pay for services and products they get from different parts of the company.

If the other part cannot deliver to the specified quality, price or speed they might get outsourced. Services today that are outsourced range from manufacturing, marketing, book-keeping, HR, payroll and even the IT department. So if you cannoyt build relationships with your internal customers you may get.......

Success in building relationships internally often relates to trust, understanding and leadership through knowledge. I could go on but it's getting late and I think this could be a future article so watch this space or I might tackle part of it in my newsletter - the customer knowledge infrastructure on this site!

Thanks (0)
avatar
By klynn
23rd Jul 2002 12:09

The company I work for is currently going through a "CRM realisation", my past is well grounded on ebuisness , so I can best understand where the pitfalls are for technology and the bottom line is peoples resistance to change.

If you can make "Change" manageable by first carrying out a needs analysis with your internal customers and act as a bridge across all depts you can quickly spot the quick wins and deliver.

This might not involve technology at all but just facilitating like minded people to meet and thrash out common objectives

I havent spent any money on technology or external consultants, because the company holds most of its answers in its employees heads

Seek to get the training dept on board, they can help you formualte and effective communcation strategy that will help bridge the "Strategic-Implementation" gap.

Sow the seeds, stand back and watch them grow!

Klynn Alibocus

CRM manager

Thanks (0)
avatar
By AnonymousUser
19th Jul 2002 19:33

I have come to prefer Customers' Success Management (CSM) to CRM, because CRM is severely handicapped -- first by its obsession with technology as the solution to customer relationships, and second by its being not customer-centric, but self-centric, i.e. focusing only on how much lifetime value the firm can get out of a relationship with customers, rather than how much lifetime value customers can get out of a relationship with the firm.

When examined in the context of internal relationships management, i.e. with employees, using ESM makes even more sense than ERM, since it is the extent to which employees believe they are gaining what they define as success through working for the firm that drives their retention intentions, as much as how much joy they get out of the work experience. And in another context, what would be one of the definitions of "internal marketing" = treating other units and departments you serve or affect as if they are your internal customers, and trying to get the units and departments that serve and affect you as if you are their customer -- also makes more sense to be conducted as CSM, where both parties are trying to promote the other's success in addition to their own.

I have an article on Employee Success Management coming out in the August issue of Health Care Strategic Management, addressing one aspect of CSM as applied to employee recruitment and retention in an industry where shortages of key staff are severe and growing.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
20th Jul 2002 04:27

We have recently implemented http://www.e11online.com as internal CRM for one of the departments of Govt. of USA. The result is very good. You can see the white paper of the same on our website.
Regards

Thanks (0)