All's well in the Microsoft world according to Bill

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Forget the gloom, doom and despondency, everything’s going to be OK – well, it is if you’re Bill Gates according to the Microsoft’s chairman’s assessment of his company’s prospects.

Speaking at Microsoft’s annual financial analyst meeting, Gates said Microsoft's position in the enterprise was strengthening, due to its server capabilities and tools and operating system focus.

He said Microsoft had seen some "remarkable successes in 2002" despite tough economic times. "Web services are gaining broad appeal,” he said. “The WS-I Web services interoperability organisation now has more than 100 members and Microsoft's Visual Studio .Net is now deploying all kinds of Web services applications."

But he dismissed the chances of niche companies or those without a broad portfolio doing well in the future. "SAP has a franchise, Siebel has a franchise, Adobe does, Oracle does for ERP, and we have a franchise,” he said. “But look at the number of times when somebody had a leading product and it gets knocked off… Think of the times when it wasn't Microsoft doing the knocking off – it's not likely. I view that with massive scepticism."

It’s a case of spend, spend, spend for the company in the coming twelve months. Gates expects to spend $5.2 billion on research and development this year, up from $4.3 billion last year, while in terms of marketing, the company intends to spend $200 million in a worldwide advertising campaign, including TV ads.

Microsoft also plans to boost its work force of 50,000 by 10 per cent. In the coming year, Microsoft will invest 22 per cent more in server salespeople, 15 per cent in the amount spent on account managers, and 47 per cent more in developer salespeople. ''It's an aggressive approach, but one I certainly believe in,'' Gates said.

The .Net initiative also looms high on the agenda. Eric Rudder, senior vice president of the developer platform and evangelism at Microsoft, said the forthcomingYukon version of Microsoft .Net will feature improved IDE and community support and will feature a new visual design tool for XML and integration with SQL Server and embrace all the languages in the Common Language Runtime. "It will also do cool things with Office and Web services," Rudder said. "We're winning customers through the .Net advantage," Rudder said. "We create the strongest foundation for business agility. Our solution is comprehensive open services, servers and tools."

Gates added that he still hopes for a favourable ruling in the antitrust case pending in federal court against the software giant, but warned that if he doesn’t get it, the Supreme Court will be his next stop. "The things we don't like are permanent," he said. "It's either a favourable ruling or it's like, oh, my source code is gone.”

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By admin
11th Sep 2002 16:26

Bill bought Great Plains and Navision in advance of assuming market ownership of the Tier beloew that, the Small Busienss sector. The latter he will do by exploiting his technological advantage with Windows. Did the regulators not see that coming?

Isn't he going to have a big advatnage owning Windows code as he completes the development of the Internet orientated next generation of Samll Business Software, CRM, eTrading, etc.

The same all over again as happened Netscape and all the others that fell at the hands of this monopoly. Now we pay a fortune for basic Windows & MS Office functionality because he has a monopoly.

The only thing is will the regulators really break up Microsoft this time, will Bill go a step too far.

Seriously, will we allow one company to doiminate what they are calling 'frictionless trading'?

Remember the big porkies Bill told Lotus with OS2? Well he is now doing the same, he is probably not that interested in the ERP market, well not the SAP/Oracle ERP, the real ERP sector.

He is after the defenseless small businesses and sole traders that are in a weak bargaining power and of which there are millions and millions of out there. A fragmented market is where Microsoft do their vulture kill.

The problem is that we saw it coming and did nothing about it.

Is there a security issue here, potentially having a big portion of world trade reliant on one supplier and one technology?

Anyone disagree with me here, I would be keen to hear your commnets, I have been studying this closely for a while and it is all headed in the one direction.

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
11th Sep 2002 16:26

Bill bought Great Plains and Navision in advance of assuming market ownership of the Tier beloew that, the Small Busienss sector. The latter he will do by exploiting his technological advantage with Windows. Did the regulators not see that coming?

Isn't he going to have a big advatnage owning Windows code as he completes the development of the Internet orientated next generation of Samll Business Software, CRM, eTrading, etc.

The same all over again as happened Netscape and all the others that fell at the hands of this monopoly. Now we pay a fortune for basic Windows & MS Office functionality because he has a monopoly.

The only thing is will the regulators really break up Microsoft this time, will Bill go a step too far.

Seriously, will we allow one company to doiminate what they are calling 'frictionless trading'?

Remember the big porkies Bill told Lotus with OS2? Well he is now doing the same, he is probably not that interested in the ERP market, well not the SAP/Oracle ERP, the real ERP sector.

He is after the defenseless small businesses and sole traders that are in a weak bargaining power and of which there are millions and millions of out there. A fragmented market is where Microsoft do their vulture kill.

The problem is that we saw it coming and did nothing about it.

Is there a security issue here, potentially having a big portion of world trade reliant on one supplier and one technology?

Anyone disagree with me here, I would be keen to hear your commnets, I have been studying this closely for a while and it is all headed in the one direction.

Thanks (0)