The CRM book to keep under your pillow

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STOP PRESS!!! The CRM Bible is now available online on the CRM-Forum.

Have you ever read an article on some new CRM topic, and been baffled? The new CRM Bible published by Pyinna ought to answer all your questions – and it’s free for the asking.

It exists, it says, to allow the average CRM buyer who has better things to do than immerse themselves in CRM for a decade, to gain a quick understanding of what CRM is all about. Its concise information cuts through the jargon and the techno-waffle to give sensible advice.

Founder director of Pyinna, Steve Lamont, commented: “The CRM Bible was published to help the uninitiated gain a straightforward understanding of the issues involved. The bible will prepare them for their quest by helping them recognise the potential benefits that really do exist and also to warn of the pitfalls they may encounter along the way. We’ve packed a lot into these few pages.”

As you turn each page you get caught up reading what you meant merely to flick through – a compliment to any book. The words are simple, the logic impeccable. Have a look at the bible’s rules of CRM.

• Cost everything (internal resource is not free)
• Justify every decision
• Only pay for results
• Only deal in fixed price
• Computers are fools
• Users are kings
• Management are lords
• Customers are god
• Consultants are whores
• Technicians are aliens
• Acceptance must be by the least capable users
• Interfaces are essential – double the budget
• Write ‘must’ not ‘should’, preferably ‘will’
• Tiny steps rather than big bang
• Beg, borrow or steal before you buy
• Establish the chain of command
• Responsible means empowers (and financed)
• Appoint one single project manager
• Challenge the project manager
• All work must be part of a defined deliverable
• All deliverables must have a delivery date
• Something must be delivered on delivery date
• Show the money but don’t give it until you’re happy
• Publish your rules and gain acceptance
• Monitor conformance to the rules
• Budget for twice as much, buy half as much
• Always take up references in detail.

Get the flavour? This straight-talking book goes on to define the five types of data and their purpose. It looks at the challenges, like lack of corporate commitment, in-company politics, lack of proper training, and resistance from the sales and marketing professionals. It says you must give incentives; that the system must be proven to benefit sales and marketing by making their jobs easier.

The technical bits
It investigates return on investment, and tells how to conduct a CRM audit – and proceed to the CRM project. Technical features are broken into the things that your IT platform needs, and things that your users need. Simple really.

The section on user friendliness is followed by tips on how to sell the system internally – making sure the whole company knows why you are having a CRM system, and when it will be delivered. It suggests reviewing your team, and removing the dissenters – and creating champions in each department or group of users.

The problems
The section on things that go wrong will ring a bell with many users. It speaks of typical problems, for instance:

• The project budget runs out before the system is rolled out so the rollout is cheap, rushed and sets the system off on the wrong foot.

• A committee runs the project, so it is difficult to get decisions made at critical times.

• The atmosphere at the start is relaxed and unstructured and budget is consumed without consideration of what is being delivered.

• The project manager is managing other projects so is really hard to get hold of.

Showing off
ASPS, WAP, wireless and voice are dealt with, and when it comes to CRM shows, the tone becomes lighthearted: Have you ever been shopping and covered 100 shops, it asks, because there are 100 stands at most CRM shows. It then offers the following advice:
• Have a big breakfast (or lunch if it’s too late).
• Have an early night (shows make hangovers bad).
• Stop for plenty of rests (many stands have chairs).
• Visit the supplier web sites
• Travel by train (read the brochures on the way back).

There’s a list of useful questions to ask the supplier which could cause a nervous breakdown, and a similar set to ask on your reference visit.

There’s also a terse section on the dreaded acronym which offers the following advice:
“When face with acronyms we suggest a challenge. When someone uses an acronym that you do not understand we suggest you say, “I’m sorry, what does stand for”. And then if you feel really brave, ask, “Oh, right, and what does that mean”. And then if you are really, really brave, ask “what does that mean to a human being like me”.

A job well done
Pyinna was founded by four people with 70 years’ IT experience between them, of which 40 years has been implementing CRM. They’ve done a good job. This little book will tell you how to turn your CRM dreams into reality. Keep it under your pillow.

Pyinna

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avatar
By admin
27th Jul 2001 10:53

Wow! I've been wondering what I've been missing. All those 'White papers' and other long winded dry deserts of text.
Finally there's a product of the CRM business which doesn't just take up my time and leave
me regretting trying to educate myself.
My hard copy arrived this morning. To have and to hold. If my wife made me choose between her
and this baby it would be occupying the left side of my bed not just under the pillow.
I came back to write a comment and I couldn't find the news item. It had gone. Panic!
Now it's on a different page. What a shame, I'm sure a lot of people are going to miss out.
If you're reading this make sure you get a copy.
Robert Amses

Thanks (0)
avatar
By admin
27th Jul 2001 10:53

Wow! I've been wondering what I've been missing. All those 'White papers' and other long winded dry deserts of text.
Finally there's a product of the CRM business which doesn't just take up my time and leave
me regretting trying to educate myself.
My hard copy arrived this morning. To have and to hold. If my wife made me choose between her
and this baby it would be occupying the left side of my bed not just under the pillow.
I came back to write a comment and I couldn't find the news item. It had gone. Panic!
Now it's on a different page. What a shame, I'm sure a lot of people are going to miss out.
If you're reading this make sure you get a copy.
Robert Amses

Thanks (0)